All-Time Tackle For Loss Leaders

All-Time Tackle For Loss Leaders


August 15, 2020
Brandon Graham

It’s time for another look at an all-time leaders list.

Keep in mind that TFL numbers weren’t recorded prior to the mid-1990s; otherwise, you would probably see guys like Chris Hutchinson, Mike Hammerstein, and more on this list.

Hit the jump for the list.

  1. 55.5 – Brandon Graham (2006-2009)
  2. 47.0 – LaMarr Woodley (2003-2006)
  3. 45.5 – Jake Ryan (2011-2014)
  4. 44.5 – Chase Winovich (2015-2018)
  5. 43.5 – Shawn Crable (2004-2007)
  6. 41.0 – Victor Hobson (1999-2002)
  7. 39.0 – Larry Foote (1998-2001)
  8. 36.0 – James Hall (1996-1999)
  9. 35.0 – Frank Clark (2011-2014)
  10. 33.5 – Maurice Hurst, Jr. (2014-2017)
  11. 33.0 – Dhani Jones (1996-1999)
  12. 32.5 – Chris Wormley (2013-2016)
  13. 31.0 – Mike McCray II (2014-2017)
  14. 28.0 – Josh Williams (1996-1999)
  15. 28.0 – Taco Charlton (2013-2016)
  16. 27.5 – Tim Jamison (2004-2008)
  17. 26.5 – Ryan Van Bergen (2008-2011)
  18. 26.5 – Craig Roh (2009-2012)
  19. 26.0 – Jordan Kovacs (2009-2012)
  20. 25.5 – Khaleke Hudson (2016-2019)
  21. 25.0 – Larry Stevens (2000-2003)
  22. 25.0 – Mike Martin (2008-2011)
  23. 24.0 – Sam Sword (1995-1998)
  24. 24.0 – Grant Bowman (2000-2003)
  25. 24.0 – Pierre Woods (2002-2005)

The current leader on the team is Kwity Paye with 19.5 (2017-2019), though he has reportedly left the team to prepare for the NFL draft.

Up next is rising junior Aidan Hutchinson with 11.5 (2018-2019).

2 comments

  1. Comments: 523
    Joined: 8/12/2015
    DonAZ
    Aug 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM

    I’m a bit surprised Maurice Hurst is “only” as high as #10. I wonder if that’s because (a) he was an interior lineman as opposed to a DE; and (b) he was a known threat and so double-teamed often, which allowed others to run free?

    • Comments: 3845
      Joined: 7/13/2015
      Aug 15, 2020 at 12:43 PM

      a. It is largely because he was a DT. It’s just harder to make TFLs there. Even if you make a great play and make a tackle while getting blocked, the RB might gain a foot or a yard running up the middle just from momentum. Meanwhile, DEs have more upfield access and get more action on outside runs.

      b. I don’t know how much the double-team thing matters, although that’s kind of just a consequence of being a DT.

      You also have to remember that Hurst didn’t really play very much during his first three years on campus. He only started 17 games in his whole career, though he did rotate quite a bit as a backup. Even through his redshirt junior year in 2016, he was playing behind Ryan Glasgow.

You must belogged in to post a comment.